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2- Hand Manual

1. When approaching a person who is deaf-blind, begin the conversation by identifying yourself.

 
2.
When you want to say something in 2-hand manual but the person who is deaf-blind does not have their hand out for you, do not "grab" at it.

Tap the person on the back of the hand and they will turn their hand over and extend it to you to receive your communication.

 
3. Words and thoughts can be separated by a very brief pause.

For experienced users, communicating at a rapid rate, these pauses may not be noticeable.

 
4. Numbers are drawn onto the palm using your index finger. They should be traced in a size smaller than a toonie (1 - 1 inches in diameter).

In some cases, where the person never had vision and did not learn how to print letters or numbers, it becomes necessary to "spell" the number rather than tracing the shape of it.

 
5. Some people in the USA and other countries use the system of spelling with the index finger in block letters on the palm for all communications.

It is a way for a person who is deaf-blind to get people not acquainted with alternative communications to talk to them. The letters or numbers should not be too large as you lose the feel of the shape of the letter or number. A suitable size is between a quarter or a toonie (1 - 1 inches in diameter).
 
 

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